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Psst… Hike 4 Colorado Fourteeners In One Day4 min read

Hike 4 Colorado Fourteeners In One Day | The Denver Ear

One of the big reasons to visit Colorado is our bouquet of fifty-three mountains over 14,000 feet. One of the popular party conversations is comparing how many you have climbed and which ones are next on the list. But did you know you could get three or even four done in one day of hiking? Get Mt Democrat, Mt Cameron, Mt Lincoln and maybe Mt Bross hiked in one long, exhausting, and exhilarating day.

HIKE 4 COLORADO FOURTEENERS IN ONE DAY

The trailhead is at Kite Lake (2 hour drive from Denver) and it will be $3 to park, so bring cash to put in an envelope. Because this is a popular hike you will encounter more people on the weekends. There is also option to camp near the lake for $12 a campsite and you can start as early as you would like!

The trail is a loop and if you take it clockwise you start with Mt Democrat, counterclockwise starts at Mt Bross.

Hike 4 Colorado Fourteeners In One Day | The Denver Ear

Photo: ©photobychance

Psst…  If this sounds like a fun way to spend a day, please do so with proper preparation!

It may be warm in Denver but it is cold up where the air is much thinner, so wear layers and bring a warm cap and gloves. Take water, food and be sure to let someone know where you are going so they can celebrate your success or check on you if things go south. There are multiple options on the trails to skip one summit or another, so if the weather starts getting bad, you got a late start, or are feeling the effects of the altitude then please don’t die on these hills! Plan an early start to make the 7.25 round trip (most make it in 8 hours and start as early as 6am) and take pictures with the signs at every peak to post on social media and send to your mother. Or take your mother with you. She might enjoy that.

MOUNT DEMOCRAT

However you feel about politics, this is a mountain you have to climb. It is going to be a stair-master because the trail starts at 12,000 feet and it is a 2,000 feet climb to the top. Lots of loose rock, but places to pause along the way gives hikers a minute to catch their breath before continuing up.

Hike 4 Colorado Fourteeners In One Day | The Denver Ear

Photo: ©Peter Conlan

MOUNT CAMERON

Mt Cameron will be a much easier hike after the scramble up Democrat. Follow the trail back a bit and then a short saddle to the peak. Some say it doesn’t count as a proper 14er because it isn’t 300 feet higher than the saddle that leads up to it. If you are tired enough when you get there you can most definitely say it counts.

MOUNT LINCOLN

After another scramble down and up a saddle is Mt Lincoln. This 14nr has a tiny peak with good possibility of fierce wind, but it means you are halfway through your climb! Some say this has the most beautiful view of all the peaks, but that is something you would have to determine by actually getting to and comparing all four of them.

Hike 4 Colorado Fourteeners In One Day | The Denver Ear

Photo: ©Maxime Gauthier

MOUNT BROSS

Mt Bross is a bit of a legal gray area. The peak is is privately owned and is technically closed of from hikers unless you have permission from the landowners. The Colorado 14ner Intiative is working to get the peak open to the public, but as of the publishing of this article it is technically closed off from hikers. That is not to say you can’t summit, it just means it is not legal. We at The Denver Ear suggest respecting property rights. That being said, there are well marked trails that will take you to the summit. When it was open this mountain was an option for starting the loop around the mountains. The way up/down has lots of loose rock and shale so slow going either way. If you skip this summit it will take you around the side of the mountain which is a long hike on loose rock but eventually slopes down, back to the meadow and to Kite Lake.

Psst… Looking for other hikes? Check out Wildflowers and Waterfalls: Amazing Spring Hikes in Colorado!

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